Last year I worked on a assignment for National Geographic magazine NL/BE on amphibians in the Netherlands and Belgium. In the March issue the article is published and the magazine is already in the kiosks for sale. On the cover a picture of the moor frog. In the Netherlands,  usually in the month of March when the temperature is right, the males are blue for just a few days in a year…….just to impress the female frogs. national geographic cover


 

The Riobamba Marsupial frog is endemic to Ecuador. Once it was a common species but at this moment the frog is listed as Endangered because of a drastic population decline te be more than 50 %. This species has its name from the pouch-like skin flap on the back of the females where the larvae go through their embryonic stage. Not a real bag but rather a thin flap of skin and where the eggs are clearly visible.

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Riobamba Marsupial frog

 

 


Thanks to media partner Roots (dutch magazine) the first publication about the frogs story and the Frogs Life project  is a fact. A nice exposure (8 pages and cover) for the story about the treats that amphibians worldwide have to deal with and a very good start of the Frogs Life project. Do you know the Frogs Life facebook page? You can find the FB page here: Frogs Life Facebook  and it would be great if you push the like button!

Roots magazine publication

Roots magazine publication


Welcome to the Frogs Life project. After a long time of preparation finally the site of Frogs Life went online, thanks to René van Dam (www.digitalman.nl). To make a success of this project and to generate publicity for the amphibians and the treats that they are facing it is necessary to created media attention. Thanks to many partners this is in the coming years possible. The first publication is soon a fact: in the July issue of Roots Magazine an 8-page article will be published. Note that from every publication a fixed percentage of our nett sales going to selected organizations. The frog on the image is the Gladiator tree frog (Hypsiboas rosenbergi) and photographed in Costa Rica/ 2014

Nikon D7100, Tamron 90 mm, F/5.0, S 1/250, fill in flash.

Nikon D7100, Tamron 90 mm, F/5.0, S 1/250, fill in flash.